“De mis manos te doy a Ti”: una canción evangélica de Trinidad y Tobago

 

De mis manos te doy a Ti, ah Señor,

De mis manos te doy a Ti.

Te doy a Ti como tú me diste a mí,

De mis manos te doy a Ti.

 

Nos guiaste fuera de la oscuridad

Cuando no sabíamos donde ir.

Entonces nos pediste que te siguiéramos

Y dijimos:  NO.

 

De mis manos te doy a Ti, ah Señor,

De mis manos te doy a Ti.

Te doy a Ti como tú me diste a mí,

De mis manos te doy a Ti.

 

Sufriste por la Humanidad

Para que pudiéramos estar contigo,

Ah, ¡ que podamos mostrarte un poco de

Agradecimiento

En lo que decimos y hacemos !

 

De nuestras manos te damos a Ti, ah Señor,

De nuestras manos te damos a Ti.

Te damos a Ti como tú nos diste a nosotros,

De nuestras manos te damos a Ti…

 

*

 

” Of my hands I give to You ”

 

 

Of my hands I give to You, Oh Lord,

Of my hands I give to You.

I give to You as You gave to me,

Of my hands I give to You.

 

You led us out of darkness

When we knew not where to go,

You asked us then to follow You,

And we said:  NO.

 

Of my hands I give to You, Oh Lord,

Of my hands I give to You.

I give to You as You gave to me,

Of my hands I give to You.

 

You suffered for the sake of Man

That we might be with You,

Oh, may we show some gratefulness

In what we say and do !

 

Of our hands we give to You, Oh Lord,

Of our hands we give to You.

We give to You as You gave to us,

Of our hands we give to You…

 

_____

 

“Of my hands I give to You”  is a gospel song written by R. Repp,

recorded in the 1970s in Port of Spain, Trinidad,

by The Goretti Group Singers with The Dennis De Souza Trio.


Emily Dickinson: Two poems

 

After great pain, a formal feeling comes –
The Nerves sit ceremonious, like Tombs –
The stiff Heart questions “was it He, that bore,”
And “Yesterday, or Centuries before”?

 

The Feet, mechanical, go round
A Wooden way

 

Of Ground, or Air, or Ought –
Regardless grown,
A Quartz contentment, like a stone –

 

This is the Hour of Lead –
Remembered, if outlived,
As Freezing persons recollect the Snow –
First – Chill – then Stupor –  then the letting go –

 

*

 

Italiano:

 

Dopo una grande pena, un sentimento formale subentra –
I Nervi siedono cerimoniosi, come Tombe –
Il Cuore irrigidito si chiede “fu proprio Lui, che soffrì,”
E “Ieri, o Secoli fa?”

 

I Piedi, meccanicamente, vanno tutt’intorno –
Un Legnoso percorso
Di Terra, o Aria, o Altro –

 

Incuranti del divenire,
Un appagamento di Quarzo, come una pietra –

 

Questa è l’Ora Plumbea –
Ricordata, se si sopravvive,
Come un Assiderato, rammenta la Neve –

 

Prima – il Freddo – poi lo Stupore – poi il lasciarsi andare –

 

*

 

Español:


Después de un gran dolor un sentimiento solemne llega –
Los Nervios descansan ceremoniosos, como Tumbas –
El Corazón endurecido se pregunta  ¿si fue Él, quien aguantó,
Y Ayer, o hace Siglos?


Los Pies dan vuelta mecánicamente –
Una senda Rígida
De Suelo, de Aire, de Obligación –
Crecido sin cuidado alguno,
Una conformidad de Quarzo, como una piedra – 

Esta es la Hora de Plomo –
Recordados, si hay sobrevivientes,
Como las personas Helandas recolectan la Nieve –
Primero – Frío – después Asombro – después rendirse –

_____

 

 

To make Routine a Stimulus
Remember it can cease –
Capacity to terminate
Is a specific Grace –
Of Retrospect the Arrow
That power to repair
Departed with the torment
Become, alas, more fair –

 

*

 

Italiano:

 

Per fare della Routine uno Stimolo
Ricorda che può cessare –
La capacità di concludere
È una specifica Grazia –

Della Memoria la Freccia
Quel potere di riparare
Spartito con il tormento
Diventa, ahimè, più caro –

 

 

Traduzione Italiana de Giuseppe Ierolli

 

Giuseppe Ierolli has translated the complete works of Emily Dickinson – sì,

tutte le opere !  He is an acknowledged expert on the poet’s life and oeuvre;

his passion makes for a true labour of love.

 

 

*

 

Español:


Para hacer la Rutina un Estímulo

Recuerda que puede cesar –

La abilidad de terminar

Es una Gracia específica –

De Retrospección la Flecha

Ese poder de reparar

Partió con el tormento

¡ay de tí!, sé mas justo –

 

Traducciones al español por Lidia García Garay

_____

 

Emily Dickinson, (1830 – 1886), was

born and raised in Amherst, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

She was eccentric, reclusive, and a prolific poet –

though only a handful of her thousand-plus poems

were published in her lifetime.

Unusual for 19th-century poems, Dickinson’s

often had short line lengths, made frequent

use of the dash, and no titles.  Early posthumous editions of

her poetry were edited so as to force her verse into

the poetical conventions of the period.  These two poems,

written in 1862 and 1871 respectively, are

modernizers of English well before the advent of

20th century experimentation.


Δυνάμωσις + Κρυμμένα

 

“Growing in Spirit”

 

 

He who hopes to grow in spirit
will have to transcend obedience and respect.
He will hold to some laws
but he will mostly violate
both law and custom, and go beyond
the established, inadequate norm.
Sensual pleasures will have much to teach him.
He will not be afraid of the destructive act:
half the house will have to come down.
This way he will grow virtuously into wisdom.

 

 

*

 

 

Greek:

 

 

Δυνάμωσις

 

 

Όποιος το πνεύμα του ποθεί να δυναμώσει
να βγει απ’ το σέβας κι από την υποταγή.
Aπό τους νόμους μερικούς θα τους φυλάξει,
αλλά το περισσότερο θα παραβαίνει
και νόμους κ’ έθιμα κι απ’ την παραδεγμένη
και την ανεπαρκούσα ευθύτητα θα βγει.
Aπό τες ηδονές πολλά θα διδαχθεί.
Την καταστρεπτική δεν θα φοβάται πράξι·
το σπίτι το μισό πρέπει να γκρεμισθεί.
Έτσι θ’ αναπτυχθεί ενάρετα στην γνώσι.

 

 

*

 

 

Español:

 

 

“Creciendo en Espíritu”

 

El que espera crecer en espíritu

tendrá que transcender la obediencia y el respeto.

Cumplirá ciertas leyes

pero más que todo violará

la ley y la costumbre ambas, e irá más allá

de la norma establecida insuficiente.

Los placeres sensuales tendrán mucho que enseñarle.

No tendrá miedo del acto destructor:

tendrá que echar abajo la mitad de la casa.

De esta manera madurará virtuosamente en sabiduría.

 

 

*

 

 

“Hidden Things”

 

 

From all I did and all I said
let no one try to find out who I was.
An obstacle was there that changed the pattern
of my actions and the manner of my life.
An obstacle was often there
to stop me when I’d begin to speak.
From my most unnoticed actions,
my most veiled writing—
from these alone will I be understood.
But maybe it isn’t worth so much concern,
so much effort to discover who I really am.
Later, in a more perfect society,
someone else made just like me
is certain to appear and act freely.

 

 

*

 

 

Greek:

 

 

Κρυμμένα

 

 

Aπ’ όσα έκαμα κι απ’ όσα είπα
να μη ζητήσουνε να βρουν ποιος ήμουν.
Εμπόδιο στέκονταν και μεταμόρφωνε
τες πράξεις και τον τρόπο της ζωής μου.
Εμπόδιο στέκονταν και σταματούσε με
πολλές φορές που πήγαινα να  πω.
Οι πιο απαρατήρητές μου πράξεις
και τα γραψίματά μου τα πιο σκεπασμένα —
από εκεί μονάχα θα με νιώσουν.
Aλλά ίσως δεν αξίζει να καταβληθεί
τόση φροντίς και τόσος κόπος να με μάθουν.
Κατόπι — στην τελειοτέρα κοινωνία —
κανένας άλλος καμωμένος σαν εμένα
βέβαια θα φανεί κ’ ελεύθερα θα κάμει.

 

 

Translated from Greek into English by Edmund Keeley / Philip Sherrard

 

*

 

Español:


 

“Cosas Ocultas”

 

 

De todo lo que hice y dije,

que nadie intente descubrir quien yo era.

Había un obstáculo allá que cambió el diseño

de mis actos y la manera de mi vida.

Allá había un obstáculo, a menudo,

para pararme cuando yo comenzaba a hablar.

De los actos más desapercibidos,

de la obra escrita más velada –

de aquellos solamente yo seré comprendido.

Pero quizás no vale la pena tanta inquietud,

tanto esfuerzo para descubrir quien soy yo en verdad.

Después, en una sociedad más perfecta,

algún otro – hecho justamente como yo –

con seguridad aparecerá y se comportará con libertad.

 

 

Traducciones al español por Alexander Best

 

_____

 

Constantine Cavafy (Konstantin Kavafis), 1863-1933,

was born and died in Alexandria, Egypt,

though his parents were from Greece.   He

wrote most of his poems after the age of 40,

all the while holding a dull job as a civil servant.

He is one of the great poets in modern Greek, and

though the Greek originals are in rhyme,  still

Keeley and Sherrard (the standard setters for 20th-century

Greek poetry translation, along with George Savidis), in their free-verse

English renderings remain true to Kavafis’ signature “pondering-aloud” style

as well as preserving the poet’s subtlety of feeling and tone.


Carlos Drummond de Andrade: Um boi vê os homens + No meio do caminho

Carlos Drummond de Andrade

“Um boi vê os homens”

.

Tão delicados (mais que um arbusto) e correm e correm de um para o outro lado, sempre esquecidos de alguma coisa. Certamente falta-lhes não sei que atributo essencial, posto se apresentem nobres e graves, por vezes.
Ah, espantosamente graves, até sinistros.
Coitados, dir-se-ia que não escutam nem o canto do ar nem os segredos do feno,
como também parecem não enxergar o que é visível
e comum a cada um de nós, no espaço.
E ficam tristes e no rasto da tristeza chegam à crueldade.
Toda a expressão deles mora nos olhos –
e perde-se a um simples baixar de cílios, a uma sombra.
Nada nos pêlos, nos extremos de inconcebível fragilidade, e como neles há pouca montanha, e que secura e que reentrâncias e que impossibilidade de se organizarem em formas calmas, permanentes e necessárias.
Têm, talvez, certa graça melancólica (um minuto) e com isto se fazem
perdoar a agitação incômoda e o translúcido vazio interior que os torna tão pobres e carecidos de emitir sons absurdos e agônicos: desejo, amor, ciúme
(que sabemos nós), sons que se despedaçam e tombam no campo
como pedras aflitas e queimam a erva e a água,
e difícil, depois disto, é ruminarmos nossa verdade.

*

In English:

“An Ox Looks At Man”

.

They are more delicate even than shrubs and they run
and run from one side to the other, always forgetting
something.
Surely they lack I don’t know what
basic ingredient, though they present themselves
as noble or serious, at times.
Oh, terribly serious,
even tragic.
Poor things, one would say that they hear
neither the song of the air nor the secrets of hay;
likewise they seem not to see what is visible
and common to each of us, in space.
And they are sad,
and in the wake of sadness they come to cruelty.
All their expression lives in their eyes – and loses itself
to a simple lowering of lids, to a shadow.
And since there is little of the mountain about them –

nothing in the hair or in the terribly fragile limbs
but coldness and secrecy – it is impossible for them
to settle themselves into forms that are calm, lasting
and necessary.
They have, perhaps, a kind
of melancholy grace (one minute) and with this they allow
themselves to forget the problems
and translucent inner emptiness
that make them so poor and so lacking
when it comes to uttering silly and painful sounds:
desire, love, jealousy –  (what do we know ?)

– sounds that scatter and fall in the field
like troubled stones and burn the herbs and the water,
and after this it is hard to keep chewing away at our truth.

*

En Español:

“Mira al Hombre el Buey”

.

Son tan delicados (más que los arbustos) y corren

y corren de un lado a otro, siempre olvidando algo.

Seguramente, les falta no sé

cual atributo esencial , aunque presentan a si mismos

como nobles or serios – a veces.

Ah, profundamente serios,

aun trágicos.

Pobrecitos, alguien podría decir que no escuchan

ni la canción del aire ni los secretos del heno,

como también parecen que no observan lo que es visible

y común a cada uno de nosotros, en el espacio.

Y están tristes,

y a su paso de la tristeza llegan a la crueldad.

Toda su expresión vive en los ojos – y se pierde

en un simple bajar de los párpados, a una sombra.

Y ya que hay poco de la montaña en ellos –

nada en su cabello o dentro los miembros de una inconcebible fragilidad

solo el friolento y el secreto – para ellos, es imposible

acostumbrarles a las formas tranquilas, duraderas

Y necesárias.

Tienen, quizás, una cierta gracia melancólica (un minuto) y con ésta les permiten

olvidar la agitación incómoda

y el vacío interior transparente

que les ponen tan pobres y tan careciendo

cuando dan los sonidos absurdos y agónicos:

el deseo, el amor, los celos – ¡ No sabemos nada ! –

los sonidos que esparcen y caen en el campo

como las piedras preocupadas y queman la hierba y el agua,

y después de ésto es difícil a seguir rumiando el asunto de nuestra verdad.


.

Traducción al español por Alexander Best

*

“No meio do caminho”

.

No meio do caminho tinha uma pedra
tinha uma pedra no meio do caminho
tinha uma pedra
no meio do caminho tinha uma pedra

Nunca me esquecerei desse acontecimento
na vida de minhas retinas tão fatigadas.
Nunca me esquecerei que no meio do caminho
tinha uma pedra
tinha uma pedra no meio do caminho
no meio do caminho tinha uma pedra.

*

In English:

“In the middle of the road”

.

In the middle of the road there was a stone
there was a stone in the middle of the road
there was a stone
in the middle of the road there was a stone.

Never should I forget this event
in the life of my fatigued retinas.
Never should I forget that in the middle of the road
there was a stone
there was a stone in the middle of the road
in the middle of the road there was a stone.

*

En Español:

“En el medio de la carretera”

.

En el medio de la carretera había una piedra

había una piedra en el medio de la carretera

había una roca

en el centro del camino había una roca.

Que nunca yo debería escaecer este acontecimiento

en la vida de mis retinas fatigadas.

Que nunca yo debería escaecer que en el medio de la carretera

había una piedra

había una piedra en el medio de la carretera

en el centro del camino había una roca.

 

.

Traducción (y interpretación) al español por Alexander Best

 

*     *     *

Carlos Drummond de Andrade, 1902 – 1987, was a Brazilian poet,

born in Minas Gerais.  His Portuguese poems often have a free-verse style,

and are full of every-day observations  seen through a socialist eye.

Translations into English from the original Portuguese by Mark Strand

Mark Strand is a Pulitzer-Prize-winning poet and translator.  His thoughtful

translations of de Andrade’s poems recreate the beautiful plain-ness of the originals.


“En Mi Vida” por John Lennon

_____

“En mi Vida ”

Hay lugares que recuerdo

Durante toda mi vida

Aunque algunos han cambiado,

Unos para siempre y no para mejor

Algunos han desaparecido

Y otros quedan todavía,

Todos éstos lugares tienen sus momentos

Con amantes y amigos que aún puedo recordar,

Hay muertos y otros que viven,

En mi vida… les he amado a todos.

 

Pero, entre todos estos amigos y amantes

No hay nadie como tu,

Y pierden estas memorias su sentido

Cuando pienso en el amor como algo nuevo,

Aunque sé que no perderé el cariño

Por la gente y las cosas que ántes fueron,

Sé que pararé a menudo

a pensar en ellos,

En mi vida…a tí te amo más.

 

Aunque sé que no perderé el cariño

Por la gente y las cosas que ántes fueron,

Sé que pararé a menudo

a pensar en ellos,

En mi vida…a tí te amo más.

En mi vida…a tí te amo más.

_____

Traducción al español por Alexander Best

Translation into Spanish by Alexander Best

_____

 

*

 

“In My Life”

(poem by John Lennon, set to music by Paul McCartney, 1965)

 

There are places I remember
All my life though some have changed,
Some forever not for better
Some have gone and some remain,
All these places have their moments
With lovers and friends I still can recall,
Some are dead and some are living,
In my life I’ve loved them all.

But of all these friends and lovers
There is no one compares with you ,
And these memories lose their meaning
When I think of love as something new,
Though I know I’ll never lose affection
For people and things that went before,
I know I’ll often stop and think about them,
In my life I love you more.

Though I know I’ll never lose affection
For people and things that went before,
I know I’ll often stop and think about them,
In my life I love you more.
In my life I love you more.


Zaman / Time

_____

 

Gec kalmişhktan midir ne;

Yildiz gibi kaviyor şimdi zaman.

Oysa bir zamanlar;

Bir somun ekmek,

Bir margarin,

Bir piknik tüpü,

Bir nebze sevgi için,

Bitmeyecek kuyruklar gibiydi zaman.

 

_____

 

Muharrem Aşan